What Is a Guardianship?

Guardianship is a legal action where the court deems an adult an incapacitated person and appoints someone, the guardian, to make decisions about the care and finances of the individual.

The guardianship process is started by a petition being filed with the court. For a person to be deemed incapacitated by the court, the petitioner must provide medical evidence of the individual’s incapacity.

The Phoenix Reporter’s recent article entitled “What is a guardianship?” explains that to be found incapacitated, the court must determine that the individual’s ability to receive and evaluate information effectively, and to communicate decisions, is impaired to such a level that he or she is partially or totally unable to manage his financial resources or to meet the essential requirements for his physical health and safety.

After the petition is filed, the individual alleged to be incapacitated must be given written notice of the action and told of their right to counsel. A formal hearing is held, and the alleged incapacitated person has a right to be at the hearing and is typically required to be at the hearing (unless a physician excuses him or her because their welfare could be harmed by attending). During the hearing, evidence is presented to demonstrate that the person is incapacitated, that the guardianship is necessary and that there’s not a less restrictive alternative. The court will render a decision on whether the appointment of the guardian is necessary and, if appropriate, will adjudicate the individual an incapacitated person. The guardian is then empowered to make decisions regarding the incapacitated person’s care and financial management.

The court can decide to appoint a guardian of the person and/or a guardian of the estate. The guardian of the person makes decisions on where the individual will live, his or her safety and physical wellbeing, along with his or her daily health care. In contrast, the guardian of the estate manages the finances and property of the person.

Any qualified individual, corporate fiduciary, non-profit corporation, or county agency may serve as guardian. The guardian has ongoing oversight by the court and must file annual reports. However, when first appointed as the guardian of the estate, he or she must file an inventory of the incapacitated person’s assets.

A guardianship should be a last resort and only used where necessary and where there are no less restrictive alternatives. Most guardianships can be avoided with proper estate planning.

A guardianship is a more restrictive tool in dealing with incapacity than a power of attorney. A power of attorney gives you more flexibility, and there’s usually no involvement by the court. A durable power of attorney is one of the most important estate planning documents you can have and can prevent the need for a guardianship in the event of incapacity. Ask an experienced estate planning attorney or elder law attorney for assistance.

One of the main goals of our law practice is to help families like your plan for safe, problem free, and successful transfer of assets to the next generation. Call our office today to schedule a time for us to review your estate plan and identify the best strategies for you and your family to ensure your legacy of love and financial security. Our office is located in Santa Ana, CA but we serve all of California including Irvine, Orange, Tustin, Newport Beach, and Anaheim.
For more information and articles on estate planning, probate, trust law, and business planning, please visit our website and subscribe to our monthly e-newsletter.

Reference: The Phoenix Reporter (Sep. 1, 2021) “What is a guardianship?”

Please Share!
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Enjoy Our Weekly Blog Digest!