What are Trustee Fees?

When creating an estate plan, it may be necessary to name a trustee to handle your assets.

What are Trustee Fees?A frequent example is when you create a revocable living trust to pass on assets to your children. You must name a trustee to manage those assets. You might name yourself as trustee, although some situations may require that it be another individual or organization. An issue to consider are the trustee fees. Trustees assume responsibilities when managing assets, and the fees can compensate them for their time and efforts.

Yahoo Finance’s recent article entitled “Trustee Fees: What Are They and Who Pays?” explains that trustee fees are a payment for services rendered. A trustee can be an individual or an organization, like a bank, wealth management company or other financial institution. Trustees will do various duties, depending on the instructions in the trust document. However, their primary job is to make certain that the assets held in a trust are managed according to the trust grantor’s (creator’s) wishes for the trust’s beneficiaries.

The trust creator will usually set out the terms of payment for a trustee in the trust document. Let’s look at some different ways to structure trustee fees. One fee structure is to pay the trustee a set percentage of the assets in the trust each year. This is typically used with larger trusts with significant assets that continually appreciate or generate ongoing income. With a smaller trust, a different fee structure might be used. Instead of a percentage, you might pay the trustee a flat dollar amount, each year. If they don’t have as many duties, they could be paid an hourly rate.

When drafting a trust document with the help of an experienced estate planning attorney, the grantor can set the terms of payment, including capping how much can be paid in trustee fees.

If a trust doesn’t mention trustee fees in the trust document, state law can determine the fee. Typically, fees can either be charged as a percentage of assets or as a percentage of transactions associated with money moving in or out of the trust.

There are no set rules for calculating the amount trustees can charge for their time. However, there are some common guidelines. In many instances, a trustee will charge a minimum of 1% when dealing with larger trusts with significant assets. Smaller trusts frequently use a flat fee model. Trustee fees are paid out of the trust’s assets. Fees are typically paid quarterly.

Trustees are also entitled to reimbursement for any expenses, such as travel expenses, storage fees, taxes, insurance, or other expenses they incur related to the management of the trust. These expenses are reimbursable, regardless of whether the trust document specifies any guidelines for reimbursement.

The trustee fees are tax deductible to the trust, and the fees are considered taxable income for the trustee. If you’re uncertain what to pay (or what to charge if you’re acting as a trustee), speak with an estate planning attorney.

One of the main goals of our law practice is to help families like your plan for safe, problem free, and successful transfer of assets to the next generation.  Call our office today to schedule a time for us to review your estate plan and identify the best strategies for you and your family to ensure your legacy of love and financial security.  Our office is located in Santa Ana, CA but we serve all of California including Irvine, Orange, Tustin, Newport Beach, and Anaheim.

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Reference: Yahoo Finance (Aug. 14, 2020) “Trustee Fees: What Are They and Who Pays?”

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